WELCOME TO OUR

BUSINESS WRITING COURSE OUTLINE

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Writing is a key method of communication for most people, and it’s one that many people struggle with. This workshop will give participants a refresher on basic writing concepts such as spelling, grammar, and punctuation. It will also provide an overview of the most common business documents such as proposals, reports, and agendas. All of this will provide that extra edge in the workplace.

  • Gain better awareness of common spelling and grammar issues in business writing.

  • Review basic concepts in sentence and paragraph construction.

  • Know the basic structure of agendas, email messages, business letters, business proposals, and business reports.

  • Know tips and techniques to use when deciding the most appropriate format to use for agendas, email messages, business letters, business proposals, and business reports.

  • Know tips and techniques in writing agendas, email messages, business letters, business proposals, and business reports.

  • Gain an overview of Request for Proposals, Projections, Executive Summaries, and Business Cases.

  • Define proofreading and understand techniques in improving proofreading skills.

TYPES OF SENTENCES

FOUR KINDS OF SENTENCES:
 

  1. Declarative - The most commonly used sentence type in business writing, these are sentences that make a statement. 
    Example: We are writing to inform you that your account would be expiring in ten days.


     

  2. Interrogative - These are sentences that ask a question. 
    Example: Would you be format renewing your account this year?
     

  3. Imperative - These are sentences that give a command or make a request. 
    Example: Please inform Joseph that we would be expecting his payment on Monday. 
     

  4. Exclamatory - These are sentences that express strong feeling. 
    Example: Congratulations for getting promoted to Vice-President!

THE BASIC PARTS

THE THREE BASIC PARTS OF A PARAGRAPH
 

  1. Topic Sentence
    The topic sentence is the first sentence in a paragraph. It introduces the main idea of the entire paragraph. It is also called the ‘controlling sentence’ because it gives the writer direction on where the discussion within that paragraph should go. 
     

  2. Supporting Sentence
    Supporting sentence(s) expand your topic sentence. They comprise the main body of your paragraph. 
    There can be more than one supporting sentence in a paragraph, and they should be arranged in the best logical order.
     

  3. Closing Sentence
    The closing sentence is the last sentence in a paragraph. It reminds the reader what the paragraph is all about, often by restating the main idea behind the entire discussion or offering a conclusion.
    The closing sentence is like a ‘clincher’ statement. 

THE BASIC STRUCTURE

WRITING THE LETTER


 

  1. Always follow the rules of good grammar. You may refer to English writing style guides for these rules. 

  2. Always use full sentences and words with proper sentence structure. Don’t use text-speak. 

  3. Proper capitalization and punctuation are a must! In email, all caps give the impression that you’re shouting, and small caps are hard to read.  

  4. In business emails, avoid text-speak abbreviations such as ‘BTW’, ‘IMHO’ and ‘LOL’.

GRAMMER AND ACRONYMS

A FORMAL LETTER USUALLY CONTAINS THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS:
 

  1. Sender’s full name and address
     

  2. Addressee’s  full name and address
     

  3. Date the letter is sent (or assumed to fall into the hands of the receiver)
     

  4. Formal Salutation e.g. “Dear + Formal Address” 
     

  5. A Subject Heading e.g. “Re: Job Opening for Quality Control Officer”
     

  6. Letter Body
     

  7. Formal Closing e.g. “Respectfully yours, Sincerely yours,” 
     

  8. Name and Signature of the Sender

WRITING THE PROPOSAL

TIPS ON HOW TO WRITE A BUSINESS LETTER
 

  1. Keep your purpose in mind when writing a business letter. There are many types of business letters and each type has suggested content and formats. 
     

  2. Write with a positive tone. Even if the subject of your letter is unpleasant, it is important to remain courteous and tactful. Building and sustaining goodwill is imperative in all business. 
     

  3. Follow standard spelling and grammar rules, even if your letter is informal. At the end of the day, you’re still writing for business and you should never leave your professional personal behind.
     

  4. Personalize your business letter. 

MAKE SURE YOUR BUSINESS PROPOSAL IS:


 

  1. Targeted
    On target means that you have carefully studied what the other party’s need is, and you can show that you are their best option in addressing that concern.
     

  2. Well-substantiated  
    Substantiated means filled with evidence to back your claims. Decide which facts or statistics best support the project. Substantiation may also come in the form of a carefully thought out project plan.
     

  3. Persuasive
    Always keep your prime selling point in mind and make sure your writing emphasize it. Keep your tone proactive and optimistic. 
     

  4. Organized
    A winning proposal is easy to evaluate. Picture the evaluator with a checklist in hand going through your proposal - check, check, check.

BUSINESS 

WRITING COURSE

EXPERIENCE.

LEARN.

GROW.

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17 Road 210, Degla, Maadi, Cairo, Egypt.

info@jupitereclipse.com

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